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Genesis 11:22-26

Verses covered in this passage:

  • Genesis 11:22
  • Genesis 11:23
  • Genesis 11:24
  • Genesis 11:25
  • Genesis 11:26

Genesis is a book about many beginnings. The beginnings of the world, the human race, sin and redemption, and the nation of Israel to name a few. In fact, the word Genesis from the Greek means “origin,” and in Hebrew it means “beginning.” The book of Genesis contains the events of the flood, tower of Babel, Sodom and Gomorrah, and the lives of the Patriarchs.

In the beginning, God created everything by simply speaking, “God said…and it was so” (Genesis 1:6-7, 9, 11, 14-15). This is not a scientific technical account of creation, but it shows a loving God creating a universe and mankind to rule it and fellowship with God. Man was formed especially from the ground and given the breath of life from God. The woman was made from the man’s rib (Genesis 2:7).

After man fell into sin, things began to spin out of control quickly. Cain murdered his brother Abel and the human race became so violent that God decided to destroy them all with a flood. God saved one righteous man (Noah) and his family in an ark filled with animals to deliver the human race from extinction. God chose Abraham and blessed a special group of people named “Israel.” God began to unfold a plan of salvation from a coming famine by sending Joseph to rule in Egypt. The failure of man in every circumstance is met by the salvation of God. We fail, but the good news is God saves us.


In Genesis chapter 11 mankind groups together to build powerful cities instead of obeying the command of Genesis 9:1, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth.” The old spirit of rebellion and human pride was again in control, mankind was back to doing their own thing. The people came together to build a tower that would reach the heavens. God saw that their effort was leading to a rebellion against Him, so God intervened. After these events, another genealogy is given from Shem that leads to Abram. This chapter answers the questions, why are we divided and why are there so many different languages? It ends with the beginning of Abraham’s story.


The lineage tracing from Shem to Abram draws to a close with  Abram and his two brothers.

Abram’s grandfather and brother are both named Nahor. A city known as Nahur is located not far from Haran in northwestern Mesopotamia. The grandfather Nahor lived 138 years, a much shorter lifespan than his father Serug (230 years) or his son Terah (205 years). Rebekah, the wife of Isaac and mother of Esau and Jacob, is from the “town of Nahor” (Genesis 24:10) and is the granddaughter of Nahor (Genesis 22:23). This town name could be connected with Nahor.

Assyrian sources mention a place-name Til (ša) Turaḫi situated on the Balikh River not far from Haran and Nahor. The name may be connected with Terah. Terah becomes a father at a much later age (seventy years) than his predecessors, who became fathers in their early thirties.

Abram is the 10th generation from Shem, just as Noah was the 10th generation from Adam. As with the birth of Adam and Noah, the birth of Abram represents a turning point in human history. Abram persisted in his faith and was declared righteous before God as Romans 4:3 declares, “For what does the Scripture say? ‘Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness” (Romans 4:20-23; Genesis 15:5-6).

Biblical Text

22 Serug lived thirty years, and became the father of Nahor; 23 and Serug lived two hundred years after he became the father of Nahor, and he had other sons and daughters. 24 Nahor lived twenty-nine years, and became the father of Terah; 25 and Nahor lived one hundred and nineteen years after he became the father of Terah, and he had other sons and daughters. 26 Terah lived seventy years, and became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran.

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