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Genesis 22:19-24

Genesis is a book about many beginnings. The beginnings of the world, the human race, sin and redemption, and the nation of Israel to name a few. In fact, the word Genesis from the Greek means “origin,” and in Hebrew it means “beginning.” The book of Genesis contains the events of the flood, tower of Babel, Sodom and Gomorrah, and the lives of the Patriarchs.

 

In the beginning, God created everything by simply speaking, “God said…and it was so” (Genesis 1:6-7, 9, 11, 14-15). This is not a scientific technical account of creation, but it shows a loving God creating a universe and mankind to rule it and fellowship with God. Man was formed especially from the ground and given the breath of life from God. The woman was made from the man’s rib (Genesis 2:7).

 

After man fell into sin, things began to spin out of control quickly. Cain murdered his brother Abel and the human race became so violent that God decided to destroy them all with a flood. God saved one righteous man (Noah) and his family in an ark filled with animals to deliver the human race from extinction. God chose Abraham and blessed a special group of people named “Israel.” God began to unfold a plan of salvation from a coming famine by sending Joseph to rule in Egypt. The failure of man in every circumstance is met by the salvation of God. We fail, but the good news is God saves us.


This chapter contains perhaps the greatest test of faith in the entire Bible. God asks Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac. Abraham obeys. He travels to Mt. Moriah and binds Isaac to an altar, raising a knife to kill his son who was promised to continue his family line. Abraham believed Isaac would fulfill God’s promise to make a great nation from him, and concluded that God would raise Isaac from the dead (Hebrews 11:19). The test is completed. God intervenes, telling Abraham not to kill his son, but provides a ram instead for the sacrifice. Abraham names the place of the altar, “Jehovah-Jireh,” The Lord Will Provide. The covenant between God and Abraham is reiterated. God promises blessings on Abraham’s descendants. Chapter 22 shows how God is completely sufficient. Obedience in Him always works for the good.


Abraham, Isaac, and the two servants return to Beersheba where they lived. Abraham’s brother, Nahor, had eight children with his wife Milcah. One of the eight children, Bethuel, became the father of Rebekah. Nahor also had four children with his concubine, Reumah.

Abraham, Isaac, and the two young men arose and returned to Beersheba where they lived. We are told that Abraham lived at Beersheba. This probably means he continued to live there. Beersheba is in southern Israel, it is still called that to this day. It means “well of seven” or “well of the oath.” In modern Beersheba there is a traditional location for the well of Genesis 21:31 over which Abraham swore an oath.

Now it came about after these things, after the journey to Mt. Moriah and God sparing Isaac, that Abraham receives information of his brother’s lineage. It was told to Abraham that his sister-in-law Milcah also has borne children to his brother Nahor. Uz his firstborn, Buz his brother, Kemuel, Chesed, Hazo, Pildash, Jidlaph, and Bethuel. It is repeated that these eight Milcah bore to Nahor, Abraham’s brother.

Abraham’s brother Nahor also fathered children with his concubine, whose name was Reumah. She bore Tebah, Gaham, Tahash, and Maacah.

It should be noted that Abraham’s brother Nahor had 12 sons, as did Ishmael (Genesis 25:12-16), just as Abraham’s grandson Jacob would have 12 sons, the fathers of the 12 tribes of Israel (Israel is the name God gives to Jacob).

We are told a little more information about the family tree, that Nahor’s son, Abraham’s nephew Kemuel was the father of Aram, and more importantly, that Nabor’s son Bethuel became the father of Rebekah. This is likely why this lineage is mentioned. Rebekah would grow up to be Isaac’s wife; that account is told in Genesis 24.

Biblical Text

19 So Abraham returned to his young men, and they arose and went together to Beersheba; and Abraham lived at Beersheba. 20 Now it came about after these things, that it was told Abraham, saying, “Behold, Milcah also has borne children to your brother Nahor: 21 Uz his firstborn and Buz his brother and Kemuel the father of Aram 22 and Chesed and Hazo and Pildash and Jidlaph and Bethuel.” 23 Bethuel became the father of Rebekah; these eight Milcah bore to Nahor, Abraham’s brother. 24 His concubine, whose name was Reumah, also bore Tebah and Gaham and Tahash and Maacah.