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Matthew 22 Commentary


Please choose a passage to read our commentary:

Matthew 22:1-14

Jesus tells a parable about a wedding feast of the king’s son. But when the invitation is sent informing the invitees that the wedding is now, they refuse to come. Others among them kill the messengers. The king then sends an army to burn their city and invites anyone to come. At the wedding a friend of the king is there without his wedding clothes and is escorted out of the feast.

Matthew 22:15-22

The Pharisees send spies to trap Jesus into saying something against Rome. They bring along some pro-Roman Herodians as conspirators in their plot. They ask Jesus whether it is lawful to pay poll-taxes to Caesar or not. Jesus perceives their trap and calls them on it before answering their question. He asks for a coin and whose likeness it bears. When he is told the image belongs to Caesar, Jesus answers “to render to Caesar the things that belong to Caesar’s and to God the things that are God’s.”

Matthew 22:23-28

The Sadducees ask Jesus a loaded question about the resurrection. They introduce their question with an extreme scenario about a woman seven-times married. Their scenario was intended to show the ridiculousness of the resurrection.

Matthew 22:29-33

Jesus answers the Sadducees loaded question about the resurrection by pointing out their error. He then proceeds to explain how people are not given in marriage in the resurrection, before demonstrating the resurrection from the books of Moses. The crowds are amazed at His answer.

Matthew 22:34-36

A lawyer from the Pharisees asks Jesus which commandment is the greatest.

Matthew 22:37-38

Jesus answers the lawyer’s question about the great commandment. He tells Him it is this: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.”

Matthew 22:39-40

Jesus tells the Pharisees’ lawyer that the second greatest commandment is to ‘love your neighbor as your love yourself’. He tells him that this commandment along with the first, are what the entire moral code of Jewish ethics are based upon.

Matthew 22:41-46

With aid of Psalm 110, Jesus asks the Pharisees a series of questions about how the Messiah is both the Lord of David and his son? The Pharisees have no response, and Jesus’s enemies are afraid to publicly confront Him.